knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Music Artists (And Songs On Our iPods)

Mary Lambert’s “Secrets”

……

I can’t think straight, I’m so gay

Sometimes I cry a whole day
I care a lot, use an analog clock
And never know when to stop
And I’m passive, aggressive
I’m scared of the dark and the dentist
I love my butt and won’t shut up
And I never really grew up

[Pre-Chorus]

They tell us from the time we’re young
To hide the things that we don’t like about ourselves
Inside ourselves
I know I’m not the only one who spent so long attempting to be someone else
Well I’m over it

[Chorus:]
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
So what
So what
So what
So what
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
I don’t care if the world knows what my secrets are (secrets are)
So what

I love the music Mary Lambert makes sooo much!

362 notes

ettgangeratta:

fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

The Pink Choice

Even though many people seem to be open about homosexuality, it turned out to be untrue when I showed people photos of homosexual couples in intimate moments. Most of them found the photos disgusting and unacceptable. This reaction was a source of inspiration to me. My goal was to make photos about homosexuals that incite feelings of romantic love that is natural and beautiful. I chose to capture casual daily activities of the couples that can be familiar to anyone. By doing so, I hope to make the audience become interested, then gradually empathize with homosexual people.

Many projects/artworks on homosexuality in Vietnam tend to focus on either deviances (especially in movies, with images of homosexuals portrayed in ridiculous clothing and make-up, mincing, shrewish or rude manners…) or symbolic images. In photography, homosexuals are not presented as themselves in pictures. And if they are, they’re usually photographed from behind or with masks on. These all foster weird and absurd images of homosexuals rather then present more understanding perspectives. In turn, homosexuals become even more intimidated and isolated.

The Pink Choice has a different approach as it seeks out personal stories using direct language: documentary photography to capture real moments and real people.

Moreover, stories about homosexuality in Vietnam and also in the world usually end in tragedy, especially in movies. On one hand, this tragic style of storytelling can make audience become more sympathetic and understanding of the difficulties that homosexuals experience. On the other hand, the drama of homosexuals can also cause misunderstandings that lives of homosexuals are vulnerable and regretful, and that the choice to “come out” is an incredible effort against the community’s way of life. The point is, in real life, there are many homosexual people who live happily with their identity. There are homosexual couples who love, nurture and build a happy family life together.

The Pink Choice is a series of photos about the love of homosexual couples which focus on living spaces, the affectionate touches, and more importantly, the synchronized rhythm of lovers sharing life together. Viewers may not feel the personalities of the subjects in the photos, but hopefully they can feel the warmth of their love and caring. In way, I wanted to show what I see of homosexual people and not how they see themselves.

Photographer: Maika Elan
Website: www.maikaelan.com

Maika is respresented by MoST. If you’d like to find out more about them you should click here.

Forever reblog and forever wondering what I would’ve been like if I grew up there.

42,670 notes

micdotcom:

Days after Michael Brown’s death, Ferguson looks like a war zone

A vigil held for Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager gunned down by Ferguson, Mo., police on Saturday in disputed circumstances, turned into what the media described as a riot on Monday evening.

But while national coverage has focused on the indisputably counterproductive violence and destruction committed by Ferguson residents during a moment of anguish, videos and photos taken from the scene show local police aggravating the situation as well.

Years of tension have reached a boiling point

118,376 notes

chescaleigh:

Robin Williams Is NOT Free (via Phoebe Gavin)

Did you know that suicide is contagious?
Yep. A great deal of research has been done on cases spanning the last three hundred years the show that suicide rates spike after a highly publicized suicide – especially when it’s a celebrity suicide.
Does that mean we shouldn’t talk about suicide or Robin Williams? No. It means we should talk about suicide and Robin Williams responsibly.
From the CDC: ASPECTS OF NEWS COVERAGE THAT CAN PROMOTE SUICIDE CONTAGION
  • Presenting simplistic explanations for suicide
  • Engaging in repetitive, ongoing, or excessive reporting of suicide in the news
  • Providing sensational coverage of suicide
  • Reporting “how-to” descriptions of suicide
  • Presenting suicide as a tool for accomplishing certain ends
  • Glorifying suicide or persons who commit suicide
  • Focusing on the suicide completer’s positive characteristics
"But Phoebe, they’re basically saying don’t talk about suicide."
No, they’re saying is don’t make it sound attractive. 

An example of what not to do: 

Robin Williams is NOT free.

Please watch this. 

I’ve been gone for a while … I’ll still be posting slowly in the next bit … but watch this video its important.

12,272 notes

intlsugarbaby:

homosexualstereotypes:

aleaula:

tahitea:

ohmonroe:

niick4:

In 1937 two women caused a car accident by wearing shorts in public for the first time

I vow to reblog this every time is shows up on my dash

love this

they caused a car crash

No they didn’t. The man driving his car who took his eyes off the road because he was staring at a pair of women caused a car crash. He averted his eyes from the road, he endangered other people and he crashed his own car. This is all the proof you need that we live in a society that blames women for things they didn’t do.

^ Reblog for the comment and lovely picture


For the comments

intlsugarbaby:

homosexualstereotypes:

aleaula:

tahitea:

ohmonroe:

niick4:

In 1937 two women caused a car accident by wearing shorts in public for the first time

I vow to reblog this every time is shows up on my dash

love this

they caused a car crash

No they didn’t. The man driving his car who took his eyes off the road because he was staring at a pair of women caused a car crash. He averted his eyes from the road, he endangered other people and he crashed his own car. This is all the proof you need that we live in a society that blames women for things they didn’t do.

^ Reblog for the comment and lovely picture

For the comments

(Source: stability)

717,068 notes

We look at a little girl like Jada and we call her brave for speaking out against her own ongoing violation. She whose small body has withstood a behemoth of trauma is now expected to be publicly strong enough to fight an Internet meme proliferating faster than her own words can carry.

It is foolish to think that by devoting a few tweets or blog entries over a news cycle we are truly standing with her. It is foolish to think that standing with someone online or in a city hall or by a courtroom telecast on TV is affecting longterm change. I am often of the mind that girls who’ve gone through what Jada has don’t need us to stand with them. They need to be swept off their feet, hoisted onto our backs or shoulders, and carried.

~Stacia L. Brown, Carrying Jada

I love this piece. We should not expect young survivors to have to “stand” and be strong. 

(via jessicavalenti)

1,046 notes

Anonymous said: why do black women feel the need to wear weave?

esteemsters:

black--lamb:

hmm

idk maybe because of shit like this

or this

……

*sigh*

noticing a trend….

instead of asking “why black women feel the need to wear weaves” let’s ask “why black women have been made to feel that they need a weave in the first place”….

for centuries the standard of beauty has not been that of the black woman…(we all know who i’m talking about)  instead we have been pushed to ‘conform’ to those standards without any second thoughts…i mean “white is right”…right….

black women are the only group of people  who have been unmercifully criticized for the hair that grows naturally from their scalp…we have been told that our natural locs are “uncivilized’ “ugly’ undesirable’…that in order to be anywhere near beautiful we’ll have to rock straight european hair or permanently straighten our own..it’s all psychological from years and years of conforming..sadly the ideas and stigmas still have an effect on black women of today… 

it’s sad that the number of us who have gone natural are looked up to as ‘being brave’ or ‘being a leader….the fact that black women even had to “go natural” shows how much we’ve fucked up and how society has brainwashed us into believing we are less than on the beauty scale because of something God blessed us with…

what’s even more saddening, is not only do black women have to deal with the ignorance of other races not understanding our hair, but we also have to deal with the comments of black men who have fallen into the “bash black hair’ trap….the cycle never ends…

Even though the stigma behind wearing a weave is thought to be fueled by self hatred, on the complete opposite side of the spectrum some women wear weaves to better their natural hair…the elements can be SO harsh on black hair and sometimes it just needs a break. wearing a weave helps maintain hair growth while protecting it from the weather for months at a time.

Also some black women just love to change up their looks every once in awhile and they do so by wearing a weave because it’s much easier than dying, growing, or cutting their natural hair…so let them have fun expressing themselves…

in my experience, i’ve had multiple white women strictly assume that black women wear weaves to “get like them” 

nope

nuh uh

don’t

flatter

 yourself

honey

i mean because

black

women

are

the only

ones

who

do

this shit

right?

Omg the last one

35,328 notes

chescaleigh:

lacigreen:

this is rape culture, and it has got to stop.  stay strong jada.

This is so incredibly disgusting. My heart breaks for this girl. 

chescaleigh:

lacigreen:

this is rape culture, and it has got to stop.  stay strong jada.

This is so incredibly disgusting. My heart breaks for this girl. 

66,035 notes