tehbewilderness:

blackfeminism:

cognitivedissonance:

odinsblog:

racebending:

If you’ve seen Darren Aronofsky’s Noah, you may have noticed something a little weird about the semi-Biblical, semi-apocalyptic cast of the movie: they’re all white. Even the extras.

In an interview with The Higher Calling, Noah screenwriter Ari Handel spoke about the reasoning behind the lack of racial diversity in the cast.

“From the beginning, we were concerned about casting, the issue of race. What we realized is that this story is functioning at the level of myth, and as a mythical story, the race of the individuals doesn’t matter. They’re supposed to be stand-ins for all people. Either you end up with a Bennetton ad or the crew of the Starship Enterprise. You either try to put everything in there, which just calls attention to it, or you just say, ‘Let’s make that not a factor, because we’re trying to deal with everyman.’

Looking at this story through that kind of lens is the same as saying, ‘Would the ark float and is it big enough to get all the species in there?’ That’s irrelevant to the questions because the questions are operating on a different plane than that; they’re operating on the mythical plane.”

In summary, white people are stand-ins “for all people,” and no other race could possibly qualify for “everyman” status. Ari Handel’s reasoning is that the only way to dispense with the issue of racism is to remove everyone who isn’t white. Asking what happened to all the other races is akin to nitpicking about whether the arc would float or not. It’s just silly, OK? “The race of individuals doesn’t matter,” which is why they made absolutely sure that all of those individuals were white. Or something.

Unintentionally, Handel managed to illustrate everything that’s wrong with the ongoing attitude towards casting actors of color in major Hollywood movies. White people are the norm, and everyone else is just a distraction. God forbid anyone attempt to be as diverse as the cast of the Star Trek, which debuted in 1966 and included a grand total of two non-white characters.

[READ MORE]

Normative whiteness at work.

"The race of individuals doesn’t matter"…as long as they’re all White

Ugh.

hyper-invisibility and erasure in all historical films allow racist tropes to control our images of black people

This is kinda perfect if you think about it.  A story about making sure every sort of creature is saved from the flood, except people. Only one sort of people are saved. So d00dz? Are you embarrassed by how stupid you look yet, or hasn’t it quite sunk in?

(Source: hellotailor)

1,888 notes

reapersun:

Reblog = when you hit that little reblog arrow that posts a copy of the original post to your own blog with links back to me. I get notices when you do and when people reblog it from you and if anyone leaves additional comments.

Repost = when you download the image(s), either…

1,537 notes

dykeprivilege:

As important as self defined identity is important marginalised groups reserve the right to call you on your bullshit. I don’t know what you westernised young punks view as oppression, but I’m talking about institutionalised marginalisation that punishes those that do not act within expected…

41 notes

revealtheotherside:

The prettiest flower are found at the most unexpected places.

(Source: jonnovstheinternet)

212,690 notes

thisisnotjapan:

peterpayne:

One of the unwritten rules in Japan is that society will change at a slower rate than in Europe and the U.S., usually running 10-15 years or so behind. Whenever a major social policy shift or court decision occurs in the U.S. I tell my wife, “This will happen here in a decade or so, just watch,” and I’m usually right. When I first arrived in Japan in 1991, smoking was everywhere, and you literally couldn’t go 30 minutes without smelling someone’s smoke. Cigarettes were freely advertised on TV and in movie theaters, too — I remember one commercial that showed a Japanese man on a train smoking Caster cigarettes while French people sat around him smiling, the implication being “smoking this brand of cigarette will make you interesting to Europeans.” Happily for me (as a non-smoker) things have really changed, and smoking in most public places like trains and train stations is banned, or limited to specially designed smoking rooms with industrial strength air filters to clean the air. While the number of smokers in Japan is relatively high — around 32% for men and 10% for women — rates of lung cancer are actually low, which is a paradox that medical science is trying to understand. (Rates of stomach and esophageal cancers are higher for Japanese, though.)

"One of the unwritten rules in Japan is that society will change at a slower rate than in Europe and the U.S., usually running 10-15 years or so behind. "
please never, ever, give any official opinions on Japan and pass them off as facts again

/\/\ for the bolded comment

thisisnotjapan:

peterpayne:

One of the unwritten rules in Japan is that society will change at a slower rate than in Europe and the U.S., usually running 10-15 years or so behind. Whenever a major social policy shift or court decision occurs in the U.S. I tell my wife, “This will happen here in a decade or so, just watch,” and I’m usually right. When I first arrived in Japan in 1991, smoking was everywhere, and you literally couldn’t go 30 minutes without smelling someone’s smoke. Cigarettes were freely advertised on TV and in movie theaters, too — I remember one commercial that showed a Japanese man on a train smoking Caster cigarettes while French people sat around him smiling, the implication being “smoking this brand of cigarette will make you interesting to Europeans.” Happily for me (as a non-smoker) things have really changed, and smoking in most public places like trains and train stations is banned, or limited to specially designed smoking rooms with industrial strength air filters to clean the air. While the number of smokers in Japan is relatively high — around 32% for men and 10% for women — rates of lung cancer are actually low, which is a paradox that medical science is trying to understand. (Rates of stomach and esophageal cancers are higher for Japanese, though.)

"One of the unwritten rules in Japan is that society will change at a slower rate than in Europe and the U.S., usually running 10-15 years or so behind. "

please never, ever, give any official opinions on Japan and pass them off as facts again

/\/\ for the bolded comment

112 notes

fab-fro:

dancingblobthing:

gynocraticgrrl:

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

this scares me

Anything that men promote as empowering for women is always degrading…

54,335 notes

paach:

New data shows that of all races, everyone prefers dating Asian Women the most. Comedian and blogger Kristina Wong breaks down how hot an Asian woman is in this interview with “Alicia Menendez Tonight” and Josh Fischer of Facebook’s “Are you Interested?” app.

492 notes

queering101:

shittycity:

Lesbians ruined flannels for me.

Homophobes ruined society for me.

image

132,040 notes